Beat the Heat: Central Air Conditioning Cost – 2017 Buyer’s Guide

Staying cool during the sweltering heat of summer takes power. A fan helps, but doesn’t quite cut it. Portable air conditioners and window units are decent for single room use.

For a whole home, you’ll want a central system that can maintain steady temperatures in multiple rooms. Central AC delivers on power, yet there are many units to select from in the current market. Our buyer’s guide will walk you though the primary considerations such as appropriate models, installation costs, and other relevant factors to help you make to make the most informed decision.

via DiversePower

Basic Costs

In the current market, you can plan to spend between $3,500 and $7,500 for full installation of a central air conditioning system. The national average cost for a basic installation is just under $5,500.

These numbers translate to a licensed HVAC contractor installing the most feasible unit for your home. Installers’ expertise draws upon many factors, not the least of which is evaluating your current ductwork strengths and weaknesses, along with how well your home is insulated and will therefore retain the cool energy in your home.

via US Veteran Home Services Inc.

Did you know? When added to an existing forced-air heating system with the existing ductwork in place, a new central air unit for a typical 2,000 sq. ft. home will cost between $3,500 and $5,500 to install. However, if your home needs new ducts fabricated and put in place, then your total installation cost will range between $5,500 to $11,000 depending on the extent of work required to lay out the appropriate ductwork for the new central air conditioning system.

The ROI Factor

Part of what you pay for with most HVAC contractors are warranties. Modern units will typically run well for 7 to 15 years before needing replacement. Great units that are well maintained can operate for up to 18 years.

Generally, the return on investment, or ROI Factor, for central systems is a bit low. Contemporary home buyers have come to expect central air in their new home. At best, you’ll recoup 50% of the value you put into the central system at the time you sell your home. Compared with other home upgrades and improvements, such as updating insulation or installing a new roof, this is low.

With that said, the reliability of the system and how well it is maintained are arguably the most important factors for returning on the initial investment you make. Which is why warranty info matters. A contractor’s warranty will spell out how repairs are handled, in terms of cost, during the warranty period. Additionally, the manufacturer’s warranty covers the hardware and system parts that will be replaced should the need arise.

While extended warranties are tempting, they can add several thousands to the cost. Their value is debatable, as repairs may be actually less outside of these extended versions.

Plus, if you realize 10+ years is actually a good value for your system, a full replacement probably makes more sense than say $2,500 on repairs at that time. Ideally, the manufacturer of the unit includes a lifetime warranty on the original product.

Selecting The System – AKA Familiarizing Yourself With The Technical Nuances

While there are many features in the modern central AC units, some of that is bells and whistles, while others are the basics. The basics include:

  • BTU – this will determine size of the unit
  • EER – standard value noting energy efficiency, more obscure notation for central systems, less obscure for those in hotter climates
  • SEER – popular variable for noting energy efficiency in seasonal climates
  • Single-stage vs. two-stage – single-stage is the historic norm, two-stage offers power saving and noise reduction

Size and energy efficiency are generally the two main factors that govern most consumers when it comes to purchasing a new central AC system. With both BTU and SEER, the higher the number, the better the unit. However, and this can’t be emphasized enough, bigger isn’t always the most appropriate for every home.

Square footage of the rooms to be cooled in a home, will relate to the BTU calculation. So, say there is 1,000 sq. ft. of space to be cooled, then the general rule is that it will require a unit that powers at roughly 20,000 BTU’s per hour. If it were instead 2,000 sq. ft. of space, the number of BTU’s requried would be about 34,000 BTU’s per hour.

Did you know? If you were to take a central AC unit that has a capacity of 34,000 BTU’s, and install it for a smaller, 1,000 sq. ft. space, it would be detrimental and counter-productive to your overall energy efficiency. In fact, the AC unit would cycle on and off frequently, which would ultimately require greater energy than continuous operation, as well as lead to an increased operational wear-and-tear.

SEER is the variable that will drive decision between models as much as BTU’s. In fact, some model names among the top brands are based solely on the SEER factor, such as Goodman’s GSX13 (with up to a 13 SEER capacity).

In today’s world, the SEER range on the market is from 13 to 26 typically. A decade ago and earlier, finding models under SEER 13 was common, but U.S. standards in 2006 have lead the industry to adopt a minimum of 13 SEER for all manufactured products going forward.

Did you know? The bigger the SEER number, the more cost savings you’ll likely see on your energy bills over the course of a year. 😉

Selecting A System Based On The Other Factors

The other factors to consider have virtually nothing to do with the features of whatever device you may be considering. While size of rooms relates to BTU’s, there’s also overall size of your home, its shape, how it is oriented in relation to the sun, shade and prevailing winds. Additionally, the amount of insulation in the home’s envelope (ceiling/attic and walls), along with floors, and duct size and orientation in each room are all considerations that an experienced professional uses in determining which central system is most suitable for your home.

Another technical term that will inevitably come up is the Manual J Load calculations. All the primary and secondary factors are analyzed and objectively quantified, in order to calculate which unit is the most energy efficient in lieu of all environmental factors that play a role in heating up your home.

Did you know? Insulation and ductwork are very important as these can show up as weak points in retaining cool airflow within a house. Or put another way, if your home’s insulation is poor, or your home has areas where cool air is escaping via leaky ducts or through leaky ceilings, then both your home’s energy and comfort will be compromised. — These are all factors that must be accounted for during initial calculations. Ideally, they are repaired or upgraded at time of new central system installation. But sometimes, that is not feasible and often it isn’t expected to be at a level of perfection.

Selecting A System Based On Established Brands And Model Reliability

One item that may surprise you is how there are actually only a handful of manufacturers of central air systems. Do enough research and you’ll see over 200 brands on the market today. Some are considered the most established, and almost based on name alone, the most reliable. Yet, it may be helpful to know that manufacturer of the Goodman brand also makes Amana. Or the manufacturer of Carrier (United Technology) also makes Bryant, Payne, Day & Night, and Tempstar. All the major manufacturers are making more than one brand.

The established and popular brands are: Carrier, Lennox, Amana, Goodman, Rheem, Trane and York.

One thing you’ll realize is there’s no universal agreement on what makes for the best brands and models. That said, we’ll add to the diverging opinions, and provide a list of pros and cons of various brands and models for you to consider, along with their costs, and information on why we favor a particular option:

1 – Goodman offers 7 models for residential uses, with SEER ranging from 13 to 18. These are marketed under the EnergiAir line and their biggest pros are the warranty, typically 10 years, and their affordability, with models ranging in price from $800 to $2,000.

Goodman central AC units are designed to make troubleshooting problems easy for contractors. The units emphasize lower noise levels in their designs.

One well-known disadvantage is that Goodman air conditioners don’t compete well with other brands that emphasize greater energy efficiency, with higher SEER models.

Note: Goodman manufacturing purchased Amana Heating & Cooling in 1997. Amana brand is often slightly higher in price, but their biggest pro is the service life, which is typically 15 years.

2 – Day & Night Comfort is a lesser know brand, but it is made by the same company that makes Carrier.

via Day & Night Comfort

Day & Night pros include great customer service and affordability. Units that are arguably identical to Carrier units sell for hundreds less. The SEER ranges from 13 to 19.

Their biggest con is less-established reputation which stems from lesser market share. For larger brands, an occasional bad review is easily overcome by hundreds of satisfied consumers, whereas the lesser known brands are often greatly impacted by harsher reviews.

3 – Carrier offers models with up to 21 SEER capacity.

Carrier’s biggest pro is their reputation and their AC units are routinely deemed as highly reliable. Carrier is known for offering high-end HVAC products that have the latest advances and bells and whistles to entice you.

Carrier’s disadvantage comes from the relatively high price of their products, especially when you realize that Day & Night units may very well be the same unit, but you’re paying say $300 more for brand name only. 😉

4 – York air conditioners range from 13 to 18 SEER and are middle of the road in terms of affordability. Their pros would be found if looking into commercial products where they shine, but given that reputation, they are seen as producing decent quality products for residential uses.

One well-known disadvantage of York air conditioners is their noise factor, though a model like the York UCJF (approx. $1,900) is designed to overcome noise problems.

5 – Lennox is a brand you’ll probably see topping the list ahead of others. Their reputation and market share is the primary reason for this.

A major advantage of Lennox AC units, is that they offer a SEER range from 13 to 26.

Did you know? Lenox central air conditioners are often considered the most efficient units on the market.

Lennox brand’s main disadvantages are the relatively high costs of their products. In fact, their units are more expensive than our top 2 choices! 😉

There might also be some issues in sourcing Lennox parts when the need for potential repairs arises. All internal parts of Lennox systems are proprietary, and at least some HVAC contractors report logistical problems with obtaining replacement parts for rather simple repairs.

While not the most comprehensive list, it gets you started on the homework you may wish to consider going forward with your own purchasing decision. Find the ideal local HVAC contractor and the rest ought to fall into place.

How To Go About Selecting The Right Central AC System For Your Home

There are about a dozen factors that go into choosing the right central system for your home. What may sound great in a sales pitch may not be what is most suitable to your home. Doing your homework on all the possible options and brands, plus the models within each brand is time consuming.

The biggest tip you’ll ever find on finding the best central AC unit is to first find the ideal contractor. Sure, we’ve walked you through the important factors, but some of the technical terms can have you lose sight of the primary goal: to cool your home with a reliable, energy-efficient unit that provides the best cost-value at the time of purchase.

An HVAC contractor has the technical know how to translate the many factors and calculations into a meaningful way for you the buyer. Many HVAC contractors are brand loyal, meaning they are certified sellers of particular products. If you choose to do homework on your own, and have a brand in mind that you are certain you want, then finding these type of contractors may make for an ideal situation going forward. In general though, the ideal contractor will install any brand and provide you with the unit that suits your home the best.

How do you find the ideal contractor? First, network with family, friends and anyone in your trusted circle. You’re really looking for referrals from those you trust and who possibly already own a reliable and well maintained central HVAC system.

Once your referral list gets going, start checking background information on the contractors. Make sure the contractor is licensed to work in your area. Check if they have any complaints against them, and what those entail. Make sure they are bonded and insured.

Next, when a more narrowed list of pros is at your disposal, start getting quotes from the HVAC contractors that appeal to you.

Did you know? Three quotes is a suggested minimum and seven would be the upper limit.

Finally, to help whittle it down to the ideal contractor, be sure to ask questions. Here’s where doing some homework will help, otherwise you’ll be hard pressed to discern a decent answer from a truly suitable response. Questions you may ask are:

  • Is the unit you suggest sized appropriately?
  • Is my home adequately insulated for the system?
  • Please describe the airflow of your recommended product.
  • Are there any smart options to allow me to program the thermostat remotely?
  • What specifically is covered under the warranty?

What has your experience been like with getting a central AC unit installed at your home and how much were you quoted or paid for he job?