How to Give your Old Kitchen a New Look on a Budget

Kitchen remodeling is perhaps one of the most rewarding remodeling decisions you can make, especially if you’ve just purchased your home recently and your kitchen looks like it is still 1950s! 🙂 Or perhaps, it has been ages since a last major remodel in your kitchen. In this guide we will explore some creative kitchen remodel ideas you can do yourself on a budget or with the help a handy home improvement friend.

Walls and Ceilings

Simply repainting your old walls and ceilings can dramatically change the look and feel of your kitchen. I recommend that you hire a professional interior painter to apply new paint to the walls and ceiling in your kitchen. This can be done even if you have wall tiles installed in your kitchen. A professional interior painter will know the right type of primer and paint that will adhere to your tiles. You may also consider refinishing your old windows and door trim in your kitchen to give it a nice face lift and a feeling that your kitchen is brand new again.

1950s-kitchen

Professionally repainting your kitchen walls, ceiling, and trim, will probably cost you around $1,500.00, which is a great deal when it is done professionally. You can really have your kitchen transformed and renewed by doing just this one simple step! 🙂 If you are not afraid of getting your hands dirty, then go ahead and paint those old kitchen walls by yourself or with a friend. You will be able to save some money, and with proper organization, you should finish this project in a day,

Floors – Resurface or Replace?

A-marvelous-kitchen-traditional-style

Brand new floors including linoleum, porcelain tiles, or commercial grade flooring laminate tiles can be installed, if the old kitchen floors are no longer in an acceptable condition.

If the old kitchen floors are still in a somewhat decent shape, then you can simply give your old floors a face lift by deep cleaning them first, and giving them a high shine, after.

Replacing Old Appliances and Installing a Range Hood

black cabinets and stainless-steel appliances

Another important aspect of remodeling your kitchen is replacing the old appliances, with newer, more energy efficient, and more suitable ones. You will want to consider your overall kitchen design and performance of new kitchen appliances when shopping for the right stove, dishwasher, etc.

You can find a wide array of energy efficient appliances at Lowe’s, Home Depot or your local home improvement store. If you are doing a high-end remodel in your kitchen, then it is recommended that you install a suitable kitchen hood over your new cooking range.

If there is currently no range hood installed in your kitchen, then it may be necessary for you to hire a specialist to properly mount and install your new kitchen range hood including taking care of any necessary duct work for venting out the kitchen vapors collected by the range hood.

Resurfacing Old Cabinets

repainting-kitchen-cabinets

New kitchen cabinets can be very costly and can easily run several thousand dollars. You can definitely go for it “all the way” If money is not an issue. however, if you are working within a tight budget, then you can save a few grands by resurfacing your existing kitchen cabinets.

Take a trip to the local Lowe’s or Home Depot and look for Rust-Oleum’s cabinet and countertop restoration kit. I have personally used this product in my own kitchen renovation project, and I must say that I was really quite impressed with the quality of the finished product. I was able to give my old kitchen cabinets a new look for under a hundred dollars.

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Types of Asphalt Roofing Shingles: 3-Tab vs. Architectural: Costs in 2021

Like all products, asphalt shingles have advantages and disadvantages for home improvement. However, unlike all other home remodeling projects, a new asphalt shingle roof provides the most bang for your buck in terms of returned value over the short term (read as in the next decade).

asphalt shingles on a house

In this guide, we’ll explain what makes for a fully installed asphalt shingled roof, how it gets done, but perhaps most importantly how you can be squarely involved in the selection process forc all the materials.

Nearly a century and a half ago, asphalt roofing didn’t exist. So, in short order, this product went from being a new kid on the block to the number one way people in North America cover their homes!

Really, it’s more like 1901 as the first implementation of asphalt shingles and roughly 40 years later is when hundreds of millions of feet of the product were being produced.

Since the mid 1900’s, asphalt shingles have maintained popularity and received some changes like fiberglass mat and multiple layers or laminates with dimensional shingles to keep up with an ever-evolving roofing market.

How popular are asphalt shingles? It’s estimated that 75% to 80% of all homes in the U.S. are covered with some version of them.

The industry generates over $10 billion in revenue annually and yet contributes over 20 billion pounds of waste each year. Their ongoing mass production though does have the significant benefit of being able to obtain bundles of the product at a price that no other roofing material can match.

And because the skill set, along with the tools needed for installation are relatively low, the DIY route is more plausible with this product than most other types of roofing materials.

Still, unless you are a professional contractor, the knowledge of what product to select may seem too challenging to go the DIY path. Fortunately, retail outlets such as Home Depot and Lowe’s do everything they can to make the process as easy as possible. 😉 Our goal is to help you along that path.

The Basics:

The basics of a traditional asphalt shingle are cloth-like paper or fiberglass mat as a base material, with asphalt layer on top of the base as the primary waterproof material, followed a protective coat of stone/mineral granules made of hard rock. The granules are designed to meet the exact specs for a specific shingle. The granules can also be made solar-reflective to achieve Cool Roof properties required for select markets like California.

The cloth-like paper base was traditionally used back in the day with the “organic shingles”, but today, almost all asphalt shingles are made with a fiberglass mat as the base material, hence the name fiberglass shingles.

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Top 10 Kitchen Countertop Costs and Pros & Cons

In this guide, we’re exploring countertops and solid surfaces for kitchens and bathrooms.

Selecting a new countertop for your kitchen can not only be exciting, but it can also be a bit overwhelming. After all, there is such a wide variety of materials to consider, along with their thickness, benefits and drawbacks, colors, costs, and other options.

It’s not at all surprising that many homeowners are easily dazed and confused by the wide array of choices and options. In fact, many people who have already been through the process of installing a new countertop in their kitchen or bathroom will readily attest that it’s not at all an easy choice! 😉

Some of the top questions being asked by many of the “quality and cost” conscious consumers, have to deal with the cost of materials and installation costs for most common surfaces including granite, Formica, quartz, marble, and the good ol’ laminate.

If you have not faced any major remodeling decisions before, then you should know that all modern countertops have their inherent strengths and flaws. It’s up to you to decide which particular factors and material characteristics are most important to you.

Yes, it’s all about your wants and needs! 🙂 — Some of the main ones to consider are: durability, luster, heat resistance, maintenance, price and style.

In this guide, will cover the top ten most common materials for countertop surfaces. We’ll give you the necessary information, so you can make an informed decision.

| 1. Granite |
| 2. Quartz |
| 3. Solid Surface |
| 4. Wood |
| 5. Laminate |
| 6. Concrete |
| 7. Nanotech Matte |
| 8. Glass |
| 9. Stainless Steel |
| 10. Soapstone |

1. Granite

For years granite has been one of the most popular surface choices among the US homes, owning to its natural beauty, durability, and ruggedness. It’s a natural stone, so every individual slab is 100% unique in its hue, pattern and shading.

By McCullough Design Development

Since each piece is different in appearance and size, many consumers will often go to their local granite warehouse and select the actual pieces of granite that will go into their kitchen or bathroom.

Each slice of granite is approximately 9 to 10 feet long and 5 to 6 feet wide. There are some places carrying granite slabs as large as 12 feet long for those extra long open-space kitchens.

If your countertop is larger than this, the granite will need to be installed in pieces, thus inevitably resulting in some seams.

Pros:

  • Durable
  • Unique – One of a Kind!
  • Scratch-resistant
  • Stain resistant
  • Heat resistant
  • Water resistant (when sealed)
  • Easily cleaned
  • Variety of colors and patterns

Cons:

  • Expensive
  • High maintenance
  • Can break when exposed to excessive stresses during transportation or installation

Price: Granite has an average material cost of $55 to $100 per square foot depending on the size, pattern, and thickness of the slab. Although, some select species of granite can be as expensive as $150 to $250 per square foot! It will be a grand total of $3,000 to $6,500 for an average 40 square feet granite surface installed.

Tips: Save money by using a thinner slab of granite or use granite tiles for a fraction of the cost.

2. Quartz

Quartz can give granite a run for its money (especially considering the cost of higher-end granite) surfaces, with the durability and look of natural stone, minus the maintenance. It’s a very hard, impervious to water drops or moisture stone quarried out of the earth, ground into small pieces, mixed together in a sheet layer and held together in a resin as part of its manufacturing process. As with all countertops, it has some advantages and disadvantages.

By Marble of the World

Like granite it will have seams, but they will be less noticeable. Its consistent look and pattern allows the seams to blend more easily.

Quartz is a nonporous pre-engineered material, so it doesn’t need to be sealed. However, it’s not completely heat resistant. A hot pot can be sat on the counter, but it can’t be left there for very long, as the heat will react with the resin and leave a burn mark!

Pros:

  • Durable
  • More flexible than granite, which makes it stronger and more tolerant to stress
  • Available in glossy and matte finishes
  • Non-porous
  • Stain and crack resistant
  • No sealing
  • Wide range of colors
  • Easily cleaned
  • Antibacterial

Cons:

  • Not heat resistant
  • Seams

Price: $65 to $100 per square foot. It will cost you in the range of $3,500 to $5,500 for an average 40 square feet pre-engineered quartz surface installed.

3. Solid Surface

An acrylic manmade product created by DuPont under the brand name, Corian. The seamless material provides a durable, hygienic, and nonporous surface.

Orange Corian Countertop Kitchen - Susan Jay Design

By Susan Jay Design

Corian comes in a variety of colors, hues and patterns that can be designed to fit anyone’s style. Choose a stone pattern for a warm, traditional decor, white or black for a minimalist style or brighter colors for a more eclectic look. Custom colors are also available.

Its look is consistent and lends itself to soft curving designs and integrating features like sinks, drain boards and backsplashes.

Pros:

  • Nonporous
  • Stain resistant
  • Easily repaired
  • Seamless
  • Customizable
  • Several colors, patterns, and finishes
  • Quick installation
  • Easily cleaned

Cons:

  • Not heat resistant
  • Can be scratched and dented
  • Not a natural material

Price: $45 to $90 per square foot installed

4. Wood

Wood countertops have been used for hundreds of years. They’re unique, natural and add warmth to any space. Various types of wood and finishes can be used to fit different decor and lifestyles.

For a traditional style use cherry, teak, yellow cedar, mahogany, or white oak with an oil finish. For a modern or more carefree wood countertop, you can finish the wood surface with a waterproof varnish. For an eco-friendly, rustic style, reclaimed wood can be used.

rustic-wood-kitchen-top

By Hill Farm Furniture

Wood naturally contains enzymes which attack and kill bacteria, making it an excellent choice for the kitchen. Although it’s very durable, it’s not impervious to damage.

While the thought of using a butcher’s block countertop as one long chopping block may sound convenient, it’s not advisable. It would cause scratches, chipping and damage to the surface. Other options are to have a separate chopping block or have one built in.

Pros:

  • Appearance
  • Works with all designs
  • Durable
  • Gentle on glasses and dishes
  • Heat resistant
  • Recyclable

Cons:

  • Maintenance
  • Requires special care
  • Must be kept dry
  • Not scratch and dent resistant

Price: $50 to $100 per square foot installed

5. Laminate

Although it’s often scoffed at by natural material lovers, laminate is still a widely used countertop option. Not only is it budget-friendly, but new designs are also helping laminate make a huge comeback.

By Formica

Manufacturers are teaming up with top designers to create amazing on trend designs.

For a fraction of the cost, you can have the look of marble, granite, or wood. Or, if your tastes are more modern, you can choose to go with bolder, brighter colors and patterns.

Pros:

  • Budget-friendly
  • Variety of styles
  • Low maintenance
  • Easily cleaned
  • Stain resistant

Cons:

  • Laminate can crack, scratch and scorch over the years
  • More difficult to repair

Price: $10 to $25 per square foot installed

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